This Week
  • Natalie Sinisgalli turned a high-school dream into a studio of her own.

  • The first apartments will be ready next spring at Southpoint Cove in Penfield.

  • Research and development efforts in construction come from collaboration.

  • CEO Dawn Smith worked her way up through the ranks at Pace Electronics of Sodus.

  • Aloi Solutions LLC is focusing on automation and integration to grow.

  • The RBJ 75 supplement presents a list of the 75 largest private-sector employers.

Warner School receives grant to develop math, science teachers

Rochester Business Journal
September 12, 2011

The University of Rochester’s Warner School of Education has received a $749,994 grant from the National Science Foundation’s Robert Noyce Scholarship Program to better address the shortage of highly qualified math and science teachers locally.

The funding will encourage more talented science, technology, engineering, and math undergraduate majors and professionals to become certified K-12 math and science teachers, UR officials said. The effort aims to expand the number of quality teachers serving the Rochester City School District and other high-need districts across state, officials added.

The grant follows an earlier $760,983 grant to the UR’s Robert Noyce Scholars Program, which targets teacher preparation for high-need schools. The program was launched three years ago through a partnership of the Warner School; the Colleges of Arts, Sciences and Engineering; and the Rochester City School District. The combined funding of $1.5 million provides full tuition scholarships to STEM undergraduates and professionals who wish to pursue a career in teaching.

“Receiving these two competitive grants is a great tribute to our teacher preparation programs and to the strong collaborative efforts among education faculty at Warner and STEM faculty at the college, as well as with the Rochester City School District and Rochester Museum and Science Center,” said Raffaella Borasi, dean of the Warner School and principal investigator on both grants.

“Together, both grants will continue to allow us to prepare graduate students to develop strong teaching skills and prepare them for meeting the challenges of working in underserved school districts most in need of committed, talented, and well-prepared math and science educators,” Borasi said.

The grant will allow 27 new Noyce scholars to enroll tuition-free into one of the Warner School’s 15-month graduate teacher preparation programs in mathematics or science over the next three years, officials said. In return, the Noyce Scholars will commit to teach for at least two years in Rochester or another high-need district upon successful completion of their master’s program.

(c) 2011 Rochester Business Journal. To obtain permission to reprint this article, call 585-546-8303 or e-mail service@rbj.net.


What You're Saying 

Karen Zilora at 10:30:48 AM on 9/13/2011
Great, more federal money for the UR Warner School to indoctrinate new teachers with the latest in educational fads rather than what actually works. As an alumna of UR, it really upsets me how much harm the Warner School has already done. The Warner School took a prior NSF...  Read More >

Post Your Own Comment

 
Username:
Password:

Not registered? Sign up now!
 

To Do   Text Size
Post CommentPost A Comment eMail Size1
View CommentsView All Comments PrintPrint Size2
ReprintsReprints Size3
  • E-mailed
  • Commented
  • Viewed
RBJ   Google