This Week
  • Pharos Systems International has grown to become a multinational enterprise.

  • The Market at I-Square is a milestone for the $18 million project in Irondequoit.

  • Leonard Brock grew up very poor and tries to help others in need.

  • For employees today, paid leave is one of the most important benefits.

  • New Simon School dean Andrew Ainslie has a plan to raise its national stature.

  • The RBJ 75 supplement presents a list of the 75 largest private-sector employers.

Kodak logs bigger loss, drop in sales

Rochester Business Journal
April 27, 2012

Eastman Kodak Co. on Friday reported its first-quarter loss widened by nearly 50 percent as its revenues dropped sharply. Still, the company said it has reduced costs and improved its liquidity since filing bankruptcy in January.

Kodak posted a net loss of $366 million, or $1.35 a share, compared with $246 million, or 91 cents a share, a year ago. The results reflect the improvement in segment profitability, reorganization costs associated with its Chapter 11 bankruptcy case, the absence of a gain from an asset sale in the prior-year quarter, and higher restructuring charges, partially offset by the tax benefit from the net impact of a Korean tax refund.

Kodak ended the first quarter—historically its worst quarter in terms of cash generation—with a cash balance of $1.4 billion, up $500 million from year-end 2011. The increase is the result of $600 million in net new financing, use of the Chapter 11 process and reduced year-over-year cash usage for continuing operations, Kodak said.

Kodak logged revenue of $965 million in the quarter, a decline of 27 percent from $1.3 billion a year ago. The decrease reflects its exit from the digital cameras business, continued secular decline of its traditional film businesses and a $61 million reduction in revenue associated with a tax refund sharing agreement with intellectual property licensees. The reduction is the result of a refund of Korean withholding taxes recorded in the quarter as a $122 million income tax benefit.

Kodak this year reorganized its business into two segments. The consumer segment’s loss improved by $23 million to $164 million from $187 million. Excluding the impact of the Korean tax refund, the consumer segment generated an $84 million year-over-year improvement in profitability, Kodak said. The improvement was driven by several factors, including enhanced cost controls, solid revenue growth in the retail systems solutions business driven by higher demand for consumables, a 34 percent increase in consumer inkjet ink revenues, and the decision to phase out of the digital capture business.

The profitability of the commercial segment modestly improved, the company said, driven by a reduction in operating expenses, with a segment loss of $64 million compared with $67 million a year ago. The improvement was offset partially by continued decline in the traditional business, price erosion on plates due to industry overcapacity and the slowdown in industry activity prior to the start of the Drupa trade show, the company said.

Sales in the commercial segment totaled $672 million, down from $808 million. Consumer segment sales reached $293 million, down from $514 million. 

Kodak said its strategy of focusing on its most profitable businesses and strengthened cost controls resulted in profitability improvements in both business segments. Selling, general and administrative expenses decreased by $84 million compared with a year ago.

“Kodak’s reorganization is proceeding according to plan,” said Chairman and CEO Antonio Perez, in a statement.

During the quarter, we took decisive steps – including filing for Chapter 11 and exiting unprofitable businesses – to accelerate our transformation and emerge in 2013 as a profitable, sustainable business,” he said. 

Kodak noted that as of March 31 it was in compliance with all covenants under its lender agreements.

Kodak reported severance costs related to the elimination of some 1,700 positions, including approximately 1,200 manufacturing/service positions, 250 research and development positions and 250 administrative positions. Roughly 1,025 of the positions were in the United States and Canada, and 675 throughout the rest of the world, the company said in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

(c) 2012 Rochester Business Journal. To obtain permission to reprint this article, call 585-546-8303 or email service@rbj.net.


What You're Saying 

Dick Kijowski at 3:14:36 PM on 4/27/2012
Well, what great news. Now let's reward our top excutive's with that 13.5 million dollar bonus I've been reading about. If this is allowed it is insane. The board should be looking at eliminating excutive postions instead of rewarding them. It's a shame what has happened...  Read More >
Dick Kijowski at 7:55:26 AM on 5/1/2012
I'm sorry. Today I read that the judge approved bonus rewards to GM's, Presidents and lower executives. This is ludicrous. You have a company that is bleeding money, closing divisions, eliminating people but yet you have millions to pass out as a bonus. Bonus for what ??...  Read More >

Post Your Own Comment

 
Username:
Password:

Not registered? Sign up now!
 

To Do   Text Size
Post CommentPost A Comment eMail Size1
View CommentsView All Comments PrintPrint Size2
ReprintsReprints Size3
  • E-mailed
  • Commented
  • Viewed
RBJ   Google