This Week
  • Bradley Flower of RYP helps set the vision for Rochester's renaissance.

  • RMSC might help bring the passenger pigeon back from extinction.

  • Mark IV Enterprises has built some of the area's most notable projects.

  • Low interest rates prompt smaller banks to seek other ways to boost profit.

  • Auction Direct's growth strategy is to increase sales volume in existing locations.

  • The Schools Report Card has rankings for 27 districts and more than 250 schools.

Report: Rochester among poorest cities in the nation

Rochester Business Journal
December 10, 2013

Rochester is among the poorest communities in the nation, a report released Tuesday by the Rochester Area Community Foundation and ACT Rochester found.

The organizations released findings that showed 160,699 people in the nine-country region surrounding Rochester live below the federal poverty level. The highest concentration of the poor live in the city of Rochester, but the majority of the region's poor people—59 percent—live outside the city, the report states.

The concentration of poor within the city is pushing Rochester higher in rankings of poor U.S. cities, the report states. Rochester is the fifth-poorest city among the 75 largest metropolitan areas and second-poorest among comparably sized cities in those metro areas. Rochester also has the poorest school district in Upstate New York and the poorest urban district in the entire state, the report notes.
 
"It is time for us to acknowledge Greater Rochester's poverty so that we can begin to address and reverse its insidious effects on our education, economy and future as a region," said Jennifer Leonard, Community Foundation president and CEO.

The 49-page report details the levels of poverty in surrounding counties, including levels for cities, towns and villages. Community Foundation officials said they hope the report will spark a discussion and lead to action that better addresses the problem of poverty in the region.

(c) 2011 Rochester Business Journal. To obtain permission to reprint this article, call 585-546-8303 or e-mail service@rbj.net.


What You're Saying 

There are no comments yet. Be the first to add yours!

Post Your Own Comment

 
Username:
Password:

Not registered? Sign up now!
 

To Do   Text Size
Post CommentPost A Comment eMail Size1
View CommentsView All Comments PrintPrint Size2
ReprintsReprints Size3
  • E-mailed
  • Commented
  • Viewed
RBJ   Google